BnF INDIEN 336: Kantappurāṇaccurukkam

The source of all the pictures of INDIEN 336 is BnF

BnF INDIEN 336 (ex- Indien 336; described by Cabaton under the entry INDIEN 337, Catalogue sommaire, 1912, p. 49) is a palm-leaf bundle of 110 folios (355 x 35 to 40 mm; Figs. 1‒2).

Fig. 1 — BnF INDIEN 336, the bundle, tied — Courtesy of BnF

Continue reading BnF INDIEN 336: Kantappurāṇaccurukkam

A first academic collaboration between Tamil India and France: the case of BnF “Indien 246”, and the exchange of letters between Julien Vinson and U. Vē. Cāminātaiyar

Among the Tamil Palm Leaf MSS which are preserved in the BnF, a symbolically important role can be attributed to the manuscript “Indien 246” (மணிமேகலை மூலம் [Maṇimēkalai Mūlam]), because it was probably the occasion for the first bi-directional scientific correspondance between an academic representative of the Tamil-speaking Southern part of India, namely the well-known U. Vē. Cāminātaiyar [1855-1942] (உ. வே. சாமிநாதையர்), alias UVS, (உ. வே. சா.) and an academic representative of France, namely Julien Vinson [1843-1926]. It is also an example of the positive appreciation —recorded in print— by a Tamil scholar of the existence of such a ressource as the BnF (Bibliothèque Nationale de France), where treasures are preserved, which would otherwise have perished. UVS would certainly have been delighted to know that all those treasures will progressively become available to all those who value them around the world, just by clicking on a link such as THIS ONE.

Among these two scholars, the former, UVS was at the time of their first exchange employed as a தமிழ்ப்பண்டிதர் [tamiḻppaṇṭitar] in the Government Arts College, Kumbakonam  (கும்பகோணம் கவர்ன்மென்ட் காலெஜ் [kumpakōṇam kavarṉmeṇṭ kālej]) and the latter, Vinson, was at the time employed as a “Professor of Oriental Languages” in Paris, as noted by UVS on page 6 (or rather ௬) of his 1898 Editio Princeps of the Maṇimēkalai, inside the முகவுரை ‍[mukavurai} “preface”. The place where Vinson taught Tamil —and also “Hindoustani”— is now known as the INALCO, but was earlier referred to as the “École des langues orientales vivantes”, as can be seen in the signature of Vinson’s letters to UVS.

The main elements of information on the exchange between Vinson and UVS were until recently to be found only in the Maṇimēkalai successive editions and in UVS’s autobiography (என் சரித்திரம் [eṉ carittiram], henceforth UVC_EC), where the exchange is reported in several places through the eyes of UVS, who refers for instance to Vinson as “புரொபஸர் ஜூலியன் வின்ஸோன் [puropasar jūliyaṉ viṉsōṉ]” inside chapter 112 (அத்தியாயம்-112). However, since 2018, thanks to the labours of ஆ. இரா. வேங்கடாசலபதி [Ā. Irā. Vēṅkaṭācalapati], who has now published the first volume (தொகுதி 1 [tokuti 1]) of the உ. வே. சாமிநாதையர் கடிதக் கருவூலம் [u. vē. cāminātaiyar kaṭitak karuvūlam] (henceforth UVCKK), we can now read the full text of six letters written in Tamil (in 1891, 1893, 1895 and 1900) by Vinson himself —who even included poems of his own composition in honour of UVS in some of them— and also see two of those letters in facsimilé (pp. xviii-xix).

Returning now to “Indien 246” and coming to the reason why it was important for UVS to hear from Vinson about its existence, and about the existence of other Tamil MSS in Paris, I must briefly indicate

  • that the text which is preserved inside “Indien 246”, namely மணிமேகலை மூலம் [maṇimēkalai mūlam] is one of the celebrated Five Tamil Epics (ஐம்பெருங் காப்பியங்கள் [aimperuṅ kāppiyaṅkaḷ]),
  • that UVS had made himself well-known in the world of Tamil scholars by first publishing in 1887 another one of the Five Tamil Epics, namely the  சீவக சிந்தாமணி [cīvaka cintāmaṇi] and that fact is duly noted —and praised in verse— in the first letter which Vinson writes to him on 3rd April 1891 (UVCKK, 1891-7, pp. 308-309).
  • that UVS was, when he received Vinson’s first letter, in the process of publishing the most ancient of the Five Tamil Epics, namely the சிலப்பதிகாரம் [cilappatikāram], which came out in 1892, and that Vinson’s third UVCKK letter, dated 23rd june 1893 (UVCKK, 1893-18, pp. 374-375), is an acknowledgement, full of praise, of the fact that he has received a printed copy of the Cilappatikāram edition.

Regarding their exchange and its practical consequences, UVS writes in his Autobiography, in Tamil:

சிலப்பதிகார ஆராய்ச்சி நடக்கையில் 1891-ஆம் வருஷம் ஏப்ரல் மாதம் பாரிஸிலிருந்து எனக்கு ஒரு கடிதம் வந்தது. நான் பதிப்பித்த சீவகசிந்தாமணியைக் கண்டு அநத் நகரத்தில் தமிழாசிரியராக இருந்த ஜூலியன் வின்ஸோன் என்னும் பிரஞ்சு அறிஞரே அதனை எழுதியிருந்தார். […] (UVC_EC, chap. 112, extract)

While I was thus engaged in my research in Cilappatikāram, I got, in April 1891, a letter from Paris. It was from a French savant, Julien Vinson, who was a professor of Tamil in Paris, and saw my edition of Cīvakacintāmaṇi. […] (Translation: K. Zvelebil, 1994, p. 476)

He continues:

அவர் கடல் கடந்த நாட்டில் இருந்தாலும் ‘உணர்ச்சிதான் நட்பாங்கிழமை தரும்’ என்றபடி எங்கள் உணர்ச்சியினால் நாங்கள் அன்பர்களானோம். பாரிஸ் நகரத்தில் உள்ள புத்தகசாலையில் சிலப்பதிகாரப் பிரதி கிடைக்குமோ என்று அவருக்குக் கடிதம் எழுதினேன். உடனே அவர் விடை எழுதினார். 1891-ஆம் வருஷம் மே மாதம் 7-ஆம் தேதி அவர் எழுதிய அக்கடிதத்தில், ‘Bibliothèque Nationale’ என்கிற பெரிய புத்தகசாலையிலிருக்கின்ற ஓராயிரம் தமிழ்க் கையெழுத்துப் புத்தகங்களெமக்கு நன்றாய்த் தெரியும். அவைகளின் List or Catalogue பண்ணினோமானால் அவற்றுள் சிலப்பதிகாரம் இல்லை. (UVC_EC, chap. 112, extract)

In spite of the wide seas separating us we became friends, since, as the adage says, “It is the sincerity of feeling that makes true friendship.” I wrote to him, asking if a copy of Cilappatikāram was available in any Paris library. He replied by return. In his answer dated 7th May, 1891, he said, “I happen to know well all the one thousand Tamil paper manuscripts preserved in our large Biblothèque Nationale. A reference to that list or catalogue shows that no Cilappatikāram is in stock. (Translation: K. Zvelebil, 1994, p. 476)

He then adds:

பழைய புத்தகங்களோவென்றால் அந்தச் சாலையிலே மணிமேகலை ஒரு கையெழுத்துப் பிரதி உண்டு, […] அது ஓலைப் பிரதி யாகும். நாம் அதைக் கடுதாசியி லெழுதினோம், நங்கட்சிறு புத்தக சாலையிலே வைக்க ஆதலால் நீரதைப் பார்க்க வேண்டுமேல் அந்தக் கடுதாசிப் பிரதி அனுப்புவோம். (UVC_EC, chap. 112, extract)

As for ancient classics though, there is a paper manuscript copy of Maṇimēkalai in that library. […] It is a palmleaf copy. I made a copy of it on paper, to keep in my own small library. Therefore if you wish to see it, I shall send you that paper copy. (Translation: K. Zvelebil, 1994, p. 476)

As a final quotation, the following statements are certainly also very much worth repeating here.

தமிழ் நாட்டில் தங்கள் பரம்பரைச் செல்வமாகக் கருதற்குரிய ஏடுகளை நீருக்கும் நெருப்புக்கும் இரையாக்கி விட்டவர்களைப் பார்த்து வருந்திய எனக்குப் பல்லாயிர மைல்களுக்கப்பால் ஓரிடத்தில் தமிழன்னையின் ஆபரணங்கள் மிகவும் சிரத்தையோடு பாதுகாக்கப் பெறும் செய்தி மேலும் மேலும் வியப்பை உண்டாக்கி வந்தது. ஆயிரம் தமிழ்ச்சுவடிகள் பாரிஸ் நகரத்துப் புஸ்தகசாலையில் உள்ளனவென்பதைக் கண்டு, ‘இங்கே உள்ளவர்கள் எல்லாச் சுவடிகளையும் போக்கி விட்டாலும் அந்த ஆயிரம் சுவடிகளேனும் பாதுகாப்பில் இருக்கும்’ என்று எண்ணினேன். (UVC_EC, chap. 112, extract)

My wonder and admiration increased greatly when I thought of the care bestowed on the preservation of the jewels belonging to our Mother Tamil at a place many thousands of miles away, while the people in Tamilnadu itself let their inherited treasures of books on palm leaves to be destroyed by fire and flood, to my grief and pain. Hearing of the thousand Tamil manuscripts stored in the library at Paris, I thought, ‘Even if my fellow-countrymen were to lose all of their own manuscripts, those other thousand scripts at least would be well taken care of.’ (Translation: K. Zvelebil, 1994, p. 476)

I shall conclude this brief evocation of the role of Indien 246, by providing a table of content of its leaves, giving the folio location of the beginning of each of its 30 cantos (alias  [kātai]), and also providing links to the text of the Maṇimēkalai, as it stands on the site of the Tamil Virtual Academy (TVU), supplemented by a few pictures.

Canto Title (with link to TVU)

Folio references (with link to BnF)

Verbatim
P பதிகம் folio 1, recto  
1 விழா அறை காதை folio 2,  verso
2 ஊர் அலர் உரைத்த காதை fol. 3 v  
3 மலர்வனம் புக்க காதை fol. 4 v  
4 பளிக்கறை புக்க காதை fol. 7 r
5 மணிமேகலாதெய்வம் வந்து தோன்றிய காதை fol. 9 r  
6 சக்கரவாளக்கோட்டம் உரைத்த காதை fol. 11 r  
7 துயில் எழுப்பிய காதை fol. 14 v  
8 மணிபல்லவத்துத் துயர் உற்ற காதை fol. 16 v  
9 பீடிகை கண்டு பிறப்பு உணர்ந்த காதை fol. 17 v  
10 மந்திரம் கொடுத்த காதை fol. 19 r  
11 பாத்திரம் பெற்ற காதை fol. 20 v  
12 அறவணர்த் தொழுத காதை fol. 22 v  
13 ஆபுத்திரன் திறம் அறிவித்த காதை fol. 24 v  
14 பாத்திர மரபு கூறிய காதை fol. 26 r  
15 பாத்திரம்கொண்டு பிச்சை புக்க காதை fol. 28 r  
16 ஆதிரை பிச்சை இட்ட காதை fol. 29 v  
17 உலக அறவி புக்க காதை fol. 31 v  
18 உதயகுமரன் அம்பலம் புக்க காதை fol. 33 r  
19 சிறைக்கோட்டம் அறக்கோட்டம் ஆக்கிய காதை fol. 36 r  
20 உதயகுமரனை வாளால் எறிந்த காதை fol. 39 r
21 கந்திற்பாவை வருவது உரைத்த காதை fol. 41 r
22 சிறைசெய் காதை fol. 44 r  
23 சிறைவிடு காதை fol. 47 v
24 ஆபுத்திரன் நாடு அடைந்த காதை fol. 49 v  
25 ஆபுத்திரனோடு மணிபல்லவம் அடைந்த காதை fol. 52 v  
26 வஞ்சி மாநகர் புக்க காதை fol. 56 v  
27 சமயக்கணக்கர்தம் திறம் கேட்ட காதை fol. 58 r  
28 கச்சி மாநகர் புக்க காதை fol. 62 v  
29 தவத்திறம் பூண்டு தருமம் கேட்ட காதை fol. 66 v  
30 பவத்திறம் அறுகெனப் பாவை நோற்ற காதை fol. 73 v  

In conclusion of this brief exploration, I would like to mention one specific feature of this manuscript, which is the existence of a great number of explicit lacuna-s, a fact which is duly noted in Vinson’s exchange with UVS and which can be illustrated by the fragment provided below, from Indien 246, which contains the left side of the recto of folio 39, where the beginning of canto 20 is found:

Inside this extract from folio 39 r, the left most column, which we can call “margin”, contains in the top line a folio number “௩௯” (i.e. 39). ater that, we can read “இ ரு ப த # வ // து . உ @@ த ய // கு ம # னை க // க # ஞ ச ன ன // வ # ள # @ ல // றி ந த க # // @@ த –“,  which would nowadays be written “இருபதாவது. உதையகுமரனைக் காஞ்சனன் வாளால் எறிந்த காதை.

Inside the second column, we find the beginning of Canto 20, the first line being “அரசன் ஆணையின் ஆயிழை அருளால் // நி …”, which is written using the now archaic writing system, which I shall approximate in the following manner: “அ # ச னா ணை யி னா யி @@ ழ ய ரு ள # னி …”.

And if we examine the continuation of that line (for instance by CLICKING HERE), we can see that the whole first line contains, with a few variant reading, the ancient spelling equivalent of what is written “அரசன் ஆணையின் ஆயிழை அருளால் // நிரயக் கொடுஞ்சிறை நீக்கிய கோட்டம் // தீப்பிறப்பு உழந்தோர் செய்வினைப் பயத்தான் // யாப்புஉடை நற்பிறப்பு எய்” on the TVU web site and corresponds therefore to a little more than THREE AND A HALF metrical lines

However, when we reach the second line of the second column, we find a very large blank space, and the first words readable after the gap are “பொருள்புரி நெஞ்சில் புலவோன் கோயிலும்” (written “@ ப # ரு ள பு ரி @ ந ஞ சி ற பு ல @ வ # ன @ க # யி லு ம”), which is in fact the fifth metrical line of Canto 20 in the printed editions of Maṇimēkalai, starting with the 1898 Editio princeps, where we can see, on p. 177:

This means that the blank in Indien 246 corresponds to what appears as “தினர் போலப்” at the end of the fourth metrical line, and should have been written as “தி ன # @ ப # ல ப”, which indeed corresponds to the length of the gap. This seems to indicate that the person who wrote Indien 246 was EITHER copying from a damaged manuscript, OR copying from a manuscript in which the lacuna-s were already present, possibly hoping to be able some day to fill in the blanks.

[to be continued …] (25th december 2019)

BnF INDIEN 728: Alphabet and Grammar of Malayalam by Valentinus Manfredus

The source of all the pictures of INDIEN 728 is BnF

BnF INDIEN 728 (ex- Indien 82; Cabaton, Catalogue sommaire, 1912, p. 106) is a handwritten paper book/codex (330 x 220 x 18 mm). It is an alphabet and grammar of Malayalam in Latin by Valentinus Manfredus (Valentin Manfred? Valentino Manfredi?), a Carmelite missionary in Malabar (South-West coast of India) (Fig. 1).

Fig. 1 — BnF INDIEN 728, folio I, recto — Courtesy of BnF

Continue reading BnF INDIEN 728: Alphabet and Grammar of Malayalam by Valentinus Manfredus

BnF INDIEN 432: A Tamil Alphabet

The source of all the pictures of INDIEN 432 is BnF

BnF INDIEN 432 (ex- Tamoul 432; Cabaton, Catalogue sommaire, 1912, p. 61; Figs. 12) is a bundle of 22 palm leaves (295 x 20/25 mm1) with two faceted cover wooden planks, probably original, that is, not made on purpose at the BnF, like for other bundles.

Fig. 1 — BnF INDIEN 432, tied bundle — Courtesy of BnF

Fig. 2 — BnF INDIEN 432, untied bundle — Courtesy of BnF

Continue reading BnF INDIEN 432: A Tamil Alphabet

  1. The leaves are broader in their middle than at their edges. []

BnF INDIEN 528: Five Tamil Alphabets

The source of all the pictures of INDIEN 528 is BnF

BnF INDIEN 528 (ex- Tamoul 528; Cabaton, Catalogue sommaire, Paris, 1912, p. 74; Figs. 1‒2) is a bundle of 15 regular palm leaves of same dimensions (370 x 45 mm) protected by two cover wooden planks. It contains five Tamil alphabets or syllabaries (French “syllabaires”) from Sri Lanka.

Fig. 1 — BnF INDIEN 528, tied bundle — Courtesy of BnF

Fig. 2 — BnF INDIEN 528, untied bundle — Courtesy of BnF

Continue reading BnF INDIEN 528: Five Tamil Alphabets

BnF INDIEN 189: Grammar of Tamil by P. de La Lane

A blogpost by Cristina Muru

The source of all the pictures of INDIEN 189 is BnF

BnF INDIEN 189 (ex- Tamoul 189) consists in 28 paper leaves bound in one volume (260 x 200 mm). An unfoliated folio comes first, bearing the title-page (Fig. 1) on the recto and a preface (“Préface”) on the verso. 26 folios follow, all paginated except for p. 52. The original pagination appears on the upper left corner of the page on the recto of folio and on the upper right corner on the recto. Finally, there is a back guard leaf.

Fig. 1 — BnF INDIEN 189, title-page — Courtesy of BnF

Continue reading BnF INDIEN 189: Grammar of Tamil by P. de La Lane

BnF INDIEN 757 BnF: Sir Walter Elliot’s Impressions of Copper Plates

The source of all the pictures of INDIEN 757 is BnF

BnF INDIEN 757 (ex- Indien 112)1 is a bound volume (470 x 340 x 50 mm) which contains impressions of various Indian copper plates (Fig. 1). As indicated in Cabaton’s Catalogue sommaire (1912, p. 111), these were part of the collection of impressions of Sir Walter Elliot.

Fig. 1 — BnF INDIEN 757, first front guard folio, verso & second front guard folio, recto — Courtesy of BnF

Continue reading BnF INDIEN 757 BnF: Sir Walter Elliot’s Impressions of Copper Plates

  1. See “Indien 112” in black ink on front guard folios 1 and 2. []

INDIEN 508 BnF: Copper Plate from Pondicherry

The source of all the pictures of INDIEN 508 is BnF

BnF INDIEN 508 (ex- Tamoul 508) is a single copper plate (305 x 200 x 1 mm) (Fig. 1) which records five land transactions that concern the Pondicherry area and are dated to the late 17th and early 18th century. The plate was given to the BnF by Madame Goschler. It is engraved recto and verso in Tamil language and script in sriptio continua (23 lines on the recto, 26 on the verso).

Fig. 1 — BnF INDIEN 508, recto of plate — Courtesy of BnF

Continue reading INDIEN 508 BnF: Copper Plate from Pondicherry

INDIEN 188 BnF: On Tamil Language

A blogpost by Emmanuel Francis & Cristina Muru

The source of all the pictures of INDIEN 188 is BnF

BnF INDIEN 188 (ex- Tamoul 188) consists in 59 paper leaves bound in one volume (330 x 210 mm). The folios were foliated in the library (57 ff. foliated in black in the upper right corner, followed by 2 ff. blank, left unfoliated).

Cabaton in his Catalogue sommaire (1912, p. 31) based on Vinson (1867, p. 46) describes it as follows: “Recueil de trois ouvrages. 1. Alphabet tamoul-français. ― 2. Syllabaire tamoul. ― 3. Déclinaison, conjugaison et syntaxe tamoules, expliquées en portugais. 1730. Papier. 6, 1 et 48 feuillets, 310 X 200 mm.”1

Continue reading INDIEN 188 BnF: On Tamil Language

  1. The manuscript is also mentioned by Fauriel, 1891, f61r. []

INDIEN 445 BnF: Petition of the Potters of Pondicherry

A blogpost by Dr. G. Vijayavenugopal & Emmanuel Francis

The source of all the pictures of INDIEN 445 is BnF

BnF INDIEN 445 (ex- Tamoul 445) is a bundle of 5 palm-leaf folios (with various measurements and different hands) (Figs. 12). The bundle is framed by two wooden planks, added in the BnF.

Fig. 1 — BnF INDIEN 445, tied bundle — Courtesy of BnF

Continue reading INDIEN 445 BnF: Petition of the Potters of Pondicherry

INDIEN 495 BnF and the ௱ ௱ symbol/abbreviation

A blogpost by Giovanni Ciotti, Emmanuel Francis & Margherita Trento

The source of all the pictures of INDIEN 30, 445, 447 and 495 is BnF
The source of the pictures (Figs. 68) of old Tamil printed books is Société Asiatique, Paris

In the aftermath of the TST inaugural workshop, some of us had an interesting discussion regarding the colophon of Bnf Indien 495.

Fig. 1 — BnF INDIEN 495 (dated to 1829), unfoliated front folios 1r, 2r, and 3r, that is, title-folios (in French and in Tamil) and first folio of text — Courtesy of BnF

Continue reading INDIEN 495 BnF and the ௱ ௱ symbol/abbreviation

INDIEN 2 BnF: Caṅkaṟpanirākaraṇam, “Refutation of Doctrines”

The source of all the pictures of INDIEN 2 is BnF

INDIEN 2 (ex-Tamoul 1, Fig. 1) from the BnF is a bundle of 178 palm-leaf folios (330 x 25 mm; note that the folios are wider in the middle of the bundle, see Fig. 2).

Fig. 1 — BnF INDIEN 2, bundle — Courtesy of BnF

Fig. 2 — BnF INDIEN 2, bundle, seen from the side — Courtesy of BnF

Continue reading INDIEN 2 BnF: Caṅkaṟpanirākaraṇam, “Refutation of Doctrines”

INDIEN 1 BnF: Attuvaitāṉupavam, “Experience of Non-Duality”

The source of all the pictures of INDIEN 1 is BnF

INDIEN 1 (ex-Tamoul 1) from the BnF is a bundle of 22 palm-leaf folios (250 x 40 mm) (Figs. 12).

The manuscript is from the Ariel collection and cannot thus be later than 1855, when Ariel’s manuscripts were received as a donation by the Société Asiatique in Paris. Unfortunately, it does contain no scribal colophon with the date of copy.

Fig. 1 — BnF INDIEN 1, bundle — Courtesy of BnF

Continue reading INDIEN 1 BnF: Attuvaitāṉupavam, “Experience of Non-Duality”